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Making your boss care about technical debt

Making your boss care about technical debt

Lorenzo Frattini

Some disregard technical debt as something intangible that is not worth discussion. It's not always easy to get your boss on your side to take action.

Here are 3 very real problems that your boss will most likely care about that will open up a conversation about technical debt.

Poorly Designed Code

Technical debt encourages developers to take the quick and dirty route to each deadline, making the code less maintainable and more fragile with every change. Which puts long term success at risk.

Reduced Forward Motion

When building new features, developers encounter "interest payments" from past projects that need to be dealt with, making development more expensive and less predictable.

Keeping your senior devs focused on the wrong things

Your most experienced team members need to spend extra time on code reviews, troubleshooting and corrections, taking key people away from taking your product forward.

Explore these ways of framing your technical debt internally to explore if you engage your business's most senior stakeholders.

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